Richings Park*

Most of the land required for expansion is to the south of the M4 on both sides of the M25. However, there will be some activity north of the M4. This includes green infrastructure, flood storage areas, utilities infrastructure and rail improvements.

*This page contains one (1) question located within the “Have your say” section at the bottom of the page.

What happens in Richings Park

During the construction phase we will need to use land east of Old Slade Lane and south of the Poynings as a borrow pit – where material will be taken from the ground to be used elsewhere in the construction of the Project.

After this period, the areas will be used for flood storage to help store water from the Colne Brook. These storage areas will not always be flooded, and will also act as public open spaces.

Other spaces in this area may be used to improve habitats for wildlife. This area will also include a grid supply point for electrical supply – a small building to support the replacement of underground power lines.

Green space around Richings Park

We will enhance the landscape around Richings Park, including the European Protected Species Site, and will re-provide public open space.

We are proposing landscape enhancements to the Richings Park area, which will include provision of a flood storage areas and enhancement to existing wildlife sites and corridors.

The flood storage area will accommodate flood water from the Colne Brook and will include wetland and pond areas. This area will provide opportunities for habitat creation and public access.

Wildlife corridor
Enhance corridors for wildlife and biodiversity and strengthen the wildlife network through improvements to existing areas
Flood storage areas and open space
Use of flood storage areas to enhance habitat and increase opportunities for access to the natural enviroment
Re-provided open space
Flood storage areas will enhance existing water attenuation and improve habitat provision with an increase in wetland areas

Masterplan

Expanding Heathrow is more than building a new runway – we also need to build facilities for passengers, make changes to roads and car parks, and relocate some of the existing airport infrastructure.

Over the past two years we have engaged with and considered the views of over 1,000 stakeholders and our local community to help develop our preferred scheme. Over time, our new runway will increase our flights from 480,000 to just over 750,000 per year. About 80 million people fly with us each year today. This will increase to about 142 million. We will also double the amount of cargo we can handle.

As part of our application to expand Heathrow, we propose that some of the extra flights, which could be up to 25,000 additional flights per year, are introduced early on our existing two runways prior to our proposed third runway being brought into operation.

The map below shows the key features of the new airport when we have finished building. On Local overview – How we will build it we show the steps we will take to get there.

We want to finish the runway as soon as possible. If we get permission, we are aiming to complete it by the end of 2026. When the runway is open we will have finished most of the work closest to communities. Most work after that will be inside the new airport boundary. The main works outside the new airport boundary will be to Stanwell Moor Junction, the southern parkway, and the northern parkway.

Changes to traffic and local roads

Changes to traffic

While we do not expect the expanded airport to attract more traffic, there may still be localised increases and decreases. While the airport is being built there will also be construction traffic on some roads connecting the airport to the strategic road network.

The maps below give a preliminary indication of the possible changes to traffic levels in 2022 (during the construction phase), and in 2035 (nine years after we expect the runway to open).

These forecasts will be reviewed and updated before we formally apply for consent to expand the airport.

Your responses to this consultation will help us to understand how these potential changes would affect you. There are a range of measures we could use to address any specific concerns. These range from improved signage or changes to junction layouts to measures to promote the use of public transport and encourage the more efficient use of cars.

Changes on local roads

While we do not expect the expanded airport to attract more traffic, there may still be localised increases and decreases. While the airport is being built there will also be construction traffic on some roads connecting the airport to the strategic road network.

The maps below give a preliminary indication of the possible changes to traffic levels in 2022 (during the construction phase), and in 2035 (nine years after we expect the runway to open). These forecasts will be reviewed and updated before we formally apply for consent to expand the airport.

Your responses to this consultation will help us to understand how these potential changes would affect you. There are a range of measures we could use to address any specific concerns. These range from improved signage or changes to junction layouts to measures to promote the use of public transport and encourage the more efficient use of cars.

Changes on local roads - 2022
Construction traffic is expected to be highest in late 2022/early 2023, just before the expected opening of a construction rail link. Traffic on the M25 is expected to increase in 2022, as this will be one of the main access routes for the construction site. We do not expect any substantial increases in traffic on local roads around Richings Park as a result of expansion in 2022.
Changes on local roads - 2035
Results of initial transport modelling indicate that in 2035, once the expanded airport is fully operational, daily traffic levels could be slightly higher on North Park, Thorney Lane South, and Richings Way. Traffic would be slightly lower on Thorney Mill Road.

Air quality – Richings Park

The expanded airport will be designed to reduce emissions and our plans include ways to manage:

  • The way that people travel to the airport by
  • increasing the use of public transport.
  • The use of cleaner, more sustainable vehicles.
  • Emissions from older, more polluting cars by introducing a Heathrow Ultra Low Emission Zone to charge these vehicles to access the airport.

During construction, air quality in Richings Park may be affected by dust and vehicle emissions.

There will be increases in pollutant levels associated with expanding the airport, but these are not considered to be significant. Levels of all pollutants will be within the levels set by the Government to protect health.

The smell of aviation fuel may be noticeable at locations closest to the airport during certain weather conditions.

For more detail on air quality, please see Local overview – Air quality.

Noise in Richings Park

A larger Heathrow will mean some local communities will hear more noise from construction activities, from aircraft on the ground and in the air, and from local roads.

We will implement a range of measures to reduce the effects on the local community.

Construction noise

Richings Park is likely to experience high noise effects from the borrow pit nearby.

As described earlier in the document, all our construction activities will follow a ‘Code of Construction Practice’ to help manage noise.

We will provide insulation to reduce noise impacts for homes and community buildings where it is needed. In some instances, we may offer temporary re-housing, for example during periods of very noisy works.

More information on insulation and temporary re-housing is available in the Noise Insulation Policy document.

Aircraft & ground noise

Richings Park does not currently have flights directly overhead but does experience flights close by from departures and arrivals using the current northern runway.

The current northern runway is the only runway used for arrivals during easterly operations due to the legacy of the “Cranford Agreement”.

Before the new runway opens, we are planning to introduce runway alternation on easterly operations and arrivals will also land on the southern runway.

The new runway may mean an increase in noise from aircraft landing and taking off for the communities of Richings Park.

When there is no noise overhead, there may still be noise from aircraft on the ground.

To reduce ground noise, we are proposing to build noise barriers around the airport.

Road noise

Noise from roads near to Richings Park is not expected to increase with expansion.

Reducing noise effects

We have a number of proposals and plans in place to reduce these noise effects, which are described within Local overview – Reducing noise effects.

We will offer noise insulation to eligible local residents. Insulation will include things like improved double or secondary glazing, ceiling over-boarding, external doors and, where needed, roof ventilation.

We have not identified any community buildings in Richings Park that are likely to need noise insulation.

Events and more information

 

Please also see the related local area overview pages for more information:

  • During this consultation we are also hosting 43 events. To find an event near you, visit Events.

Have your say

Our Heathrow Expansion and Your Area documents set out our development proposals, their potential effects and how we propose to reduce them.

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